Is Bank On Yourself a Scam? Read These Reviews and Decide for Yourself

Scam (noun): a dishonest or illegal plan or activity, especially one for making money

Bank On Yourself (proper noun): A wealth-generating system using dividend-paying whole life insurance policies with riders that supercharge the growth of the policies. These policies are protected by a multi-layer safety net, and the companies recommended for the Bank On Yourself concept are audited by regulators in all 50 states.

Through every economy imaginable, from the terrible Great Depression of the 1930s to the “boom days” of the 1990s, to the Great Recession of 2007 – 2010, the Bank On Yourself strategy has demonstrated unfailing success for well over 160 years.

Do “Bank On Yourself” and “scam” even belong in the same sentence? To read or listen to some self-appointed experts, yeah, they do belong in the same sentence. It’s difficult for the naysayers to recognize such traits as patience, discipline, and self-restraint – the very traits that are prized by those who use and benefit from the Bank On Yourself method of safe wealth-building.

The naysayers would rather say, “It sounds too good to be true, therefore it is too good to be true.” But if something is “too good to be true” just because it sounds “too good,” then what about radio and television, motion pictures, airplanes, and even ballpoint pens? At one time or another, every one of those sounded too good to be true.

When something sounds too good to be true, examine it carefully and thoughtfully. That’s much smarter than running away from it with a closed mind.

Why Do Some People Dismiss Bank On Yourself As a Scam?

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Bank On Yourself featured in AARP

Saving Your Nest Egg in Tough Times
Saving Your Nest Egg in Tough Times

Pamela Yellen was recently interviewed by AARP about the Bank On Yourself wealth-building method for an article on “Saving Your Nest Egg in Tough Times.”

Scroll down to the second paragraph below the “50/50, if you’re 50” subhead to read the advice Pamela gave for investors age 50-65 who are fed up with watching their hard-earned nest-eggs shrink yet again.

What about investors over age 65?

Pamela also gave advice for investors between the ages of 66 and 85 who want to add more guarantees and predictability to their financial plan and bump up their returns without the risk of stocks and other investments.

Although there wasn’t space to include that advice in the AARP article, this is an increasingly popular option for Americans up through the age of 85.

This little-known option provides many advantages that annuities and CD’s do not have, including…

  • Provides guaranteed growth and a higher return
  • Exceptional flexibility and liquidity
  • Protection from estate taxes
  • Automatic long-term care coverage at no additional costs (in states where it’s available)

The Bank On Yourself Authorized Advisors are well-versed in this option and can conduct a free Analysis that will help you determine which plan is best for your unique situation.

If you’re not sure where you’ll find the funds to start a plan, don’t worry.  The Bank On Yourself Authorized Advisors are masters at helping their clients of any age restructure their finances to free up seed money to fund a plan that will help you reach as many of your long-term and short-term goals as possible – in the shortest time possible.

Remember – Wall Street already lost more than 45% of the typical investor’s savings TWICE in the last decade.  How would it affect you if this latest stock market rout is just the beginning of another look-out-below crash?

To find out how you can add predictability and guarantees to your financial plan and have the financial security and peace of mind that you want and deserve, request your FREE Analysis now.  You’ll be connected with one of only 200 financial advisors in the country who have met the rigorous training and requirements to be a Bank On Yourself Authorized Advisor.

Is Bank On Yourself too good to be true?

A review of my book, Bank On Yourself, in the December 2010 issue of the American Association of Individual Investors (AAII) Newsletter declared that the concept is “too good to be true.”

The reason given was, “A life insurance policy loan is not truly a loan.  Rather, it is an advance that the insurer must eventually pay out.  Worse yet… policy loans can erode a life insurance policy over time.”  It also pointed to “potential tax liabilities.”

This review brought to mind one of my favorite quotes…

If you’re looking for an excuse, any one will do.”

– Dan Kennedy

So I wrote the editor and explained there was some misinformation in the review, and that I would like an opportunity to correct the record, pointing out that their motto is “Unbiased Investment Education.”unbiased investment education

The editor told me to let him know what I think is incorrect, and he “will take a look at it.”  I suspected he was just “humoring me,” but gave him the benefit of the doubt.  However, when I submitted my rebuttal, he replied that they would not publish it because “there are no factual corrections to be made.”

I informed AAII I would be publishing my rebuttal on this website, and let YOU decide who is taking things out of context, committing sins of omission, and twisting the “facts”… and who is being fair and unbiased.  We’ll pick three of the most interesting, insightful and/or humorous comments made on this blog and award the posters their choice of a $25 gift certificate for a restaurant in your area or a personally autographed copy of my “too good to be true” book.

Besides that, there are several points made in my rebuttal that I have not made elsewhere, so you will find value in reading this (I made it a bit more colorful for your reading pleasure)…

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