Older Folks Say it’s Not Fun Getting Old When You’re Worried About Running Out Of Money

Record numbers of Americans older than 65 are working today, and millions are doing it by need, not by choice.

Too often, the work these folks find involves back-breaking, menial labor.

Many people are entering their golden years with alarmingly fragile finances, according to a recent article in The Washington Post.

And polls routinely show that most older people are more worried about running out of money than they are of dying. They lament it’s not fun getting old.

Thanks to a massive shift from guaranteed lifetime pensions to you’re-on-your-own-good-luck-with-that 401(k)s and IRAs…

People are forced to guess how long they might live and budget accordingly, knowing that one big health problem or a year in a nursing home could wipe it all out.”

Social Security to the Rescue?

Almost 20% of Social Security recipients age 65 and older have no other source of income. And for another 33%, Social Security accounts for 90% of their income.

Social Security cost of living increases have boosted benefits by 43% since 2000, but the typical senior’s expenses have soared by 86% during that same period, according to the Senior Citizens League.

But even those who’ve managed to save for retirement have fallen far short: The median value of retirement accounts for those between 55 and 64 is only about $120,000, according to the Federal Reserve.

The shift to do-it-yourself retirement planning has enriched Wall Street far more than the typical saver.

Nope, it’s not fun getting old when you have to worry about running out of money or are forced to work until you die.

The Solution is to Save More and to Save Where Your Growth is Guaranteed

“It’s as if we moved from a system where everybody went to the dentist to a system where everybody now pulls their own teeth,” says Teresa Ghilarducci, a retirement security specialist.

The Bank On Yourself method is based on an asset that has increased in value every single year for more than 160 years – even during the Great Recession and Great Depression. It lets you stop worrying about when the next market crash will come and wipe out 50% or more of your savings – again.

The growth in these plans is guaranteed, and they grow by a larger dollar amount every year. You can know the guaranteed minimum value of your plan on the day you want to tap into it and at every step along the way. That gives you priceless peace of mind.

Bank On Yourself plans come with an unbeatable combination of advantages, which include guaranteed, competitive growth, safety, liquidity, and control, along with some juicy tax benefits.

To find out how big your nest-egg could grow – guaranteed – if you added the Bank On Yourself safe wealth-building method to your financial plan, request a free Analysis here. You’ll get a referral to an Authorized Advisor who can design a plan custom tailored to your unique situation and goals.

They’ll also show you ways you may be able to free up money to fund a bigger plan. There’s no cost or obligation, and the sooner you start, the sooner you can enjoy a worry-free retirement. So request your Analysis here now:

Five Retirement Investment Alternatives to Your 401(k) Plan

With something as vitally important as your retirement security, you need to be aware of 401(k) problems. And you have to ask yourself, “Do I really want to have to deal with all this? Are there good alternatives to 401(k)s?”

Let’s take a look at the drawbacks to 401(k)s and good alternatives to them. The 401(k) drawbacks include:

  • Unpredictable market performance, which means the very real possibility of losing a significant portion of your nest egg
  • Rules and limitations which can cripple your options and lock your money in a virtual prison
  • Fees, both visible and hidden, which can devour one-third or more of your hard-earned money in the plan
  • Tax deferral, which can siphon off another one-third or more of your income during your retirement years

Four Major Issues You Face When Planning for Retirement: Safety, Restrictions, Fees, and Taxes

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Congress Considers Axing Your 401(k) Tax Deduction

Congress is considering proposals right now to take away the tax advantages of your 401(k).

To help finance the tax reforms being proposed, Congress is eyeing axing the up-front tax deduction for 401(k) contributions. And one proposal would also change the tax-deferred nature of 401(k)s by imposing a 15% tax on your annual gains.

Why would Congress consider tinkering with the tax benefits of such a popular program as the 401(k)?

For the same reason that notorious holdup man Willie Sutton gave for robbing banks:

Because that’s where the money is!”

The current taxation of 401(k) plans was estimated to have cost the federal government more than $90 billion in potential tax revenue last year alone, according to the Joint Committee on Taxation. [Read more…]

Why Does Ted Benna, the “Father of the 401(k),” Love the “501(k)” Plan?

The man widely credited as the “Father of the 401(k) Plan,” Ted Benna, is among those saying the plan is no longer a good way to save and invest for retirement. He cites concerns that the government may change the rules, and not in your favor; that an impending market crash will wipe out much of what you’ve saved for your retirement; and that staggering fees can eat up a large portion of your nest egg.

Benna has gone on record as endorsing something that has been creatively called a “501(k) Plan.” Don’t get distracted by the name “501(k).” Although “401(k)” refers to the section of the Internal Revenue Code that deals with retirement plans, “501(k)” is an obscure Internal Revenue Code reference that describes the educational status of certain child care organizations! Using “501(k)” to refer to some kind of retirement plan is a gimmick dreamed up by Madison Avenue types. But all they did was take the Bank On Yourself concept, which is a proven 401(k) alternative, and give it a mysterious new name, the “501(k),” hoping you’ll pay money to find out what they’re talking about.

But while others are charging you money for this information, we’ve been giving it away for years! For FREE information about the Bank On Yourself method that others call a “501(k),” download our free report, 5 Simple Steps to Bypass Wall Street, Beat the Banks at Their Own Game and Take Control of Your Financial Future here.

History of the 401(k) Plan and Ted Benna’s Contribution to It

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What Is a 501k Plan and Is It an Alternative for Saving for Retirement?

Let me cut through the hype and give you the scoop: The 501(k) plan is just the latest name the Palm Beach Research Group has given to the concept most people know as Bank On Yourself, which is based on a high cash value dividend-paying whole life insurance policy.

The Palm Beach Group has been bombarding subscribers to various email lists about a “warning” issued by the “Father of the 401(k),” Ted Benna.

The Palm Beach Research Group wants you to watch a long video interview they did with Ted Benna, where he reveals three dangers he sees coming that could impact your 401(k) and IRA accounts. He says these dangers could slash your savings by 40%. And you’re promised that by watching this long interview you’ll learn about “a non-government sponsored 501(k) plan” that may “be the only way left for most Americans to retire today.”

This secret plan is touted as a 401(k) alternative “account,” where Benna and some prominent members of Congress have put some of their savings, to shield them from these three dangers.

Unfortunately, even after you watch the lengthy interview with Ted Benna, you still won’t know what this “account” actually is—until you fork over $75 to $149 to subscribe to the Palm Beach Letter and get your copy of their “new” book, The 501(k) Plan: How to Fully Fund Your Own Worry-Free Retirement—Starting at Any Age.

You can’t judge this book by its cover

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Is “Tax-Free Retirement” Too Good to Be True?

Tax-free retirement—living a comfortable life in retirement without the obligation to pay income tax—comes as the result of planning and arranging your finances (following IRS guidelines every step of the way) so that when you retire, none of the money you receive is taxable—perhaps not even your Social Security income.

Tax-free retirement is good, and this article reveals how to make it happen.

Is Avoiding Taxes on Your Retirement Income Legal?

Reducing or avoiding taxes is perfectly legal. People take steps to reduce or avoid taxes all the time. They may donate to charity to avoid paying as much tax. They deduct their mortgage payments. They take legitimate business deductions. They may shift medical expenses, hoping to bunch expenses into one year and exceed the threshold for deductions that year. These are just a few of the legal tax-avoiding measures Americans take every day.

Many people even believe they have an IRA or a 401(k) to avoid paying taxes. But that’s a trap, because traditional IRAs, 401(k)s, and most other government-controlled retirement plans do not allow you to avoid paying taxes. They merely postpone tax day. We’ll talk more about that in a few minutes.

Over and over again courts have said that there is nothing sinister in so arranging one’s affairs as to keep taxes as low as possible. Everybody does so, rich or poor; and all do right, for nobody owes any public duty to pay more than the law demands.” — Supreme Court Justice Learned Hand

So while avoiding taxes is legal, evading taxes is not. Maybe you don’t report your income. Maybe you take deductions you’re not allowed. Or maybe you just tell the IRS to take a hike. That’s tax evasion.

But make no mistake: A tax-free retirement can be achieved legally, using IRS-approved methods.

Ways to Avoid Income Tax in Retirement

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Austrian Economics—What the Heck IS It?

What is “Austrian economics”? Let’s break it down:

Economics: “A social science concerned chiefly with description and analysis of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.” Ooo-eee! That’s gotta be a page-turner! Thank you, Merriam-Webster.

Austrian economics: “A school of economic thought that is based on methodological individualism.” Gads! But thank you, Wikipedia.

I never studied economics in college. And I’m pretty sure I didn’t take economics in high school either. Or if I did, I slept through it.

Ron Paul, 2012 Republican Presidential Contender

But “Austrian Economics” is a phrase you hear from time to time—even if it’s said in code, like what Ron Paul said following the 2012 Iowa presidential primary. “I’m waiting for the day when we can say, ‘We’re all Austrians now!’”

That struck me as odd. As Matthew Yglesias colorfully observed in his Slate article on Austrian economics, “The average Republican presidential candidate would sooner officiate at a gay marriage than praise Europe, yet here was Paul pledging allegiance to Vienna. What did he mean? Why would we all be Austrians?”

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52% of Americans Will Have to Reduce Their Lifestyle in Retirement

52% of American households are at risk of not being able to maintain their standard of living in retirement – even when factoring in potential proceeds of a reverse mortgage.

That’s according to the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College.

Let’s take a look at three critical reasons for that… and what you must do now to protect yourself…

Problem #1: People continue to live longer, but aren’t working longer

According to the Social Security Administration, 25% of people turning 65 today will live past 90, and one out of ten will live past 95, yet most financial planners base their projections of how much money you’ll need on your living to age 85 or so.

What if you’re one of the lucky ones who hangs on until 100 or longer? And just how “lucky” will you feel if you can’t provide for yourself during those final years?

Solution: Assume you’ll live to at last age 100 when determining how long your money will need to last you.

Problem #2: Underestimating health-care and long-term care costs in retirement

The numbers are shocking, and almost no one is accurately accounting for this: A 65-year-old couple retiring now will need $245,000 just to cover out-of-pocket health-care costs during retirement, PLUS another $255,000 to cover one average stay for one person in a nursing home.

Whoa! That’s half a million dollars you’ll need just for medical care… but most people close to retirement don’t even have that much in total retirement savings. [Read more…]

21 Reasons Life Insurance Policy Owners Love the Policy Loan Feature

We recently published a 3-article blog post series inspired by an article that financial planner and investment advisor Michael Kitces wrote about the problems with “banking on yourself” with life insurance policy loans.

Then we invited our readers to tell us what their biggest take-away from these articles was, and to share their personal experience with Bank On Yourself policy loans versus other sources of financing.

The many comments left on these three blog posts demonstrated once again how insightful and articulate our readers are! We’ve published excerpts from some of the comments we received below, where you’ll find 21 reasons why using a Bank On Yourself-type policy loan to access cash beats any other way of accessing capital!

In the first article, we discuss four things Mr. Kitces got right about the Bank On Yourself concept, and then reveal what he got wrong, including five fundamental concepts.

Check out What Michael Kitces Missed in His Bank On Yourself Review, Part 1. [Read more…]

The 8th Wonder of the World? Here’s proof

Recently we “ethically bribed” our readers into learning more about what I’ve called the “8th Wonder of the World.”

You see, the two most common reasons people have for adding the Bank On Yourself method to their financial plan are:

  1. To grow wealth safely and predictably every year – no matter what’s happening in the market or the economy – and to protect themselves from losses in future market crashes
  2. To become their own source of financing when they want to make a major purchase or when an emergency expense comes up – so they can get access to money when they need it and for whatever they want – no questions asked

The second reason – the ability to become your own “banker” – is so compelling that once people use that feature of their Bank On Yourself plan, they often write to tell us what a powerful and emancipating feeling it is. [Read more…]