Many Stock Market Investors Haven’t Kept Up With Inflation Over the Last 20 Years – DALBAR 2019 Report

What kind of return would you have to get in the stock market to make it worth the risk and gut-wrenching ups and downs?

Would you put your life’s savings at risk for a 5% annual return?

Or would you require at least a 7% return?

Or maybe even a 10% annual return?

If you’re like most people we’ve surveyed, you wouldn’t do it unless you thought you could get at least a 7% annual return over time, right?

Here’s the Harsh Reality of the Actual Returns Investors Are Getting…

I hope you’re sitting down because this is going to floor you: According to a new study, the typical investor in equity mutual funds has gotten only a 3.88% annual return… over the last 20 years!

But it’s actually much worse than that. Here’s why…

Have you heard the phrase “nominal return“? That’s the rate of return on an investment without adjusting for inflation.

And inflation for the past 20 years covered by the study averaged 2.17% a year. So let’s do the math:

3.88% average annual return
-2.17% average annual inflation
=1.71% real average annual return

Oops!! A 1.71% real average annual return for the last 20 years?!?

The study did take into account the average fees and expenses you pay in these accounts.

But it did not account for the taxes you’re going to pay if you’ve been saving in a tax-deferred account like a 401(k), 403(b) or IRA. And that’s going to devour at least 25%-33% of your savings, according to the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College.

That assumes tax rates don’t go up over the 20 to 30+ years of your retirement. (If you believe tax rates won’t be going up over the long term, I’ve got a Rolex watch I’ll sell you for $10.)

How did other types of investors fare over the last two decades?

Answer: Even worse than equity mutual fund investors did. Much worse!

The average investor in asset allocation mutual funds (which spread your money among a variety of classes) earned only 1.87% per year over the last two decades, but because inflation averaged 2.17% a year, they actually ended up losing 0.30% every year for 20 years.

But the biggest losers were investors in fixed-income funds. They only managed to eke out a 0.22% average annual return, significantly trailing inflation and digging themselves deeper and deeper into a hole every year.

This shocking data comes from the just-released 2019 Quantitative Analysis of Investor Behavior report by DALBAR, the leading independent, unbiased investment performance rating firm, and it covers the 20-year period ending December 31, 2018.

Once again, the study concluded that…

“The results consistently show that the average investor earns less – in many cases, much less – than mutual fund reports would suggest.”

If you’re scratching your head and thinking, “but I’m sure I did better than that,” the reality is that most investors don’t have a clue what return they’ve really gotten in their retirement accounts over time. The Bank On Yourself Authorized Advisors will have their clients get out all their annual statements and look at the numbers with them. They consistently find that people overestimate their returns by a large margin.

Wouldn’t the Classic Definition of Insanity be to Continue Doing What Clearly Hasn’t Worked for the Last Twenty Years?

If you wouldn’t be willing to put up with the stomach-churning unpredictability of the stock market for a 5% annual return over time, why would you accept a real annual return of less than 2% a year?

This is a HUGE part of the reason the typical household nearing retirement has an average of only $135,000 in their combined retirement accounts, which will provide only a $600 per month income, according to the Federal Reserve Survey of Consumer Finances.

That survey also showed that most households have little or nothing outside of the money in their retirement and investment accounts, which puts their entire life’s savings at risk in a market crash.

Wall Street’s BIG Lie is that You Must Risk Your Money in Order to Grow It

The Bank On Yourself safe wealth-building strategy puts that lie to rest. It’s a supercharged variation of an asset that’s grown in value every single year for more than 160 years, including during the Great Recession and Great Depression. It comes with an unbeatable combination of advantages, including:

If you’d like to see how adding the Bank On Yourself strategy to your financial plan could help you reach your financial goals without taking any unnecessary risks, just request your free Analysis here now.

There’s no cost or obligation, and you’ll get a referral to a Bank On Yourself Authorized Advisor who can answer any questions you may still have.

Keep in mind that the only regret most people say they have about implementing the Bank On Yourself strategy is that they didn’t start sooner and didn’t put more into their plan.

So don’t put it off another day – request your free Analysis NOW, while you’re thinking of it:

Read Reviews for Using Bank On Yourself as an Investment Alternative

When the stock market is going up, investors love it. When it’s going down, not so much.

Many investors lie awake at night wondering, “Is there any good alternative to this crazy roller coaster? Is it possible to successfully and confidently grow my nest egg without playing in the Wall Street Casino?”

If you’re one of those folks who thinks saving for retirement shouldn’t have to be so unpredictable, read on! There is a safe and proven alternative to Wall Street. It offers guaranteed growth, a predictable income stream, tax advantages, and very little in the way of government interference.

Millions have found their investment alternative of choice in high cash value dividend-paying whole life insurance.

Huh? Life Insurance as an Investment Alternative to Wall Street?

[Read more…] “Read Reviews for Using Bank On Yourself as an Investment Alternative”

How Complex Is Dividend-Paying Whole Life Insurance?

Some financial advisors say whole life insurance is complicated, and that “you should never invest in something you don’t understand.” … Then they try to sell you stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and EFTs that most laypeople can only begin to truly grasp!

Dividend-paying whole life insurance is so simple an average 10-year-old can understand the concept in 10 minutes. We’ll prove it to you now …

The Simplicity of Dividend-Paying Whole Life Insurance

The concept behind a dividend-paying whole life insurance policy is extremely simple. It’s based on five easy-to-understand ideas:

1. Your Risk Is Minimized by the “Pooled Risk” Approach of Insurance

This timeless concept is at the foundation of all forms of insurance. In its simplest form, policy owners pay an insurance company a relatively small sum of money in advance. This is called a “premium.” In exchange, they are covered for a potentially much large expense later. In this case, they receive an agreed-upon amount to cover the costs and loss of income related to the death of the insured, which is called the “death benefit.”

2. You’re Guaranteed to Have “Level-for-Life” Premiums with a Whole Life Insurance Policy

[Read more…] “How Complex Is Dividend-Paying Whole Life Insurance?”

Get Financially Naked With Your Partner to Avoid Relationship Mistakes

Do you remember the first time you got naked with your beloved?

Along with the passion of the moment, if you’re like most of us, you were probably a bit self-conscious. After all, for the first time, you may have had had to reveal that paunch you’d been hiding, those patches of cellulite or that outie belly button you’ve hated since the third grade.

But because you overcame those concerns and let yourself get naked – well, I don’t need to remind you what happened next!

The point is, when you allow yourself to get financially naked with your partner, amazing things can happen. You not only have a better understanding of one another, but you’ll also work better as a team to achieve your goals and tackle your problems.

It turns out that being clear and open with each other about financial issues is one of the most positive things you can do to ensure a “happily ever after.”

Couples May Argue About Sex, Kids and In-Laws, but It’s Their Arguments About Money that Best Predict Whether or Not They’re Headed for Divorce Court…

[Read more…] “Get Financially Naked With Your Partner to Avoid Relationship Mistakes”

The Most Important Lesson Learned from the Government Shutdown: Americans’ Finances are Fragile

The longest U.S. government shutdown in history laid bare an uncomfortable truth: Americans aren’t saving enough and the majority of us have no rainy-day fund to protect us when the inevitable you-know-what hits the fan.

More than 70% (!) of all types of employees at all income levels surveyed live paycheck to paycheck and said they’d have difficulty meeting their financial obligations if their paycheck were delayed for just one week! That’s according to the 2018 “Getting Paid in America” Survey by the American Payroll Association.

This explains why, after missing just one or two paychecks, we heard so many heart-breaking stories from government workers who weren’t being paid or were furloughed. For example… [Read more…] “The Most Important Lesson Learned from the Government Shutdown: Americans’ Finances are Fragile”

How Much Money Do You Need to Save for Retirement?

People need to save between 10% and 17% of their income if they plan to retire at 65 but are putting away only 6-8% of their income, according to a new study by the Stanford Center on Longevity. That’s only half of what they should be saving.

What percent of your household income are you saving? It’s important to be brutally honest with yourself because a shortfall of the magnitude most Americans will experience means more than just not being able to live the retirement lifestyle you dreamed of. It may mean…

  • Having to choose between putting food on the table and the medical care you need
  • Not being able to afford to pay for heating and air conditioning
  • Having to rely on the charity of your children
  • Foregoing travel and even life’s little luxuries

I doubt you worked hard all your life so that you can scrimp and sacrifice just to get by in retirement.

Fully 60% of U.S. households are at risk of not having enough money to make ends meet in retirementeven if they cut back to spending just 75% of pre-retirement levels – according to a 2018 study from the Center for Retirement Research.

The Rule of 25 for Determining How Much You’ll Need to Have Saved

[Read more…] “How Much Money Do You Need to Save for Retirement?”

Reviews for Saving for College Using the Bank On Yourself Method

When you think about saving for your children’s college tuition, what savings vehicle comes to mind?

Families often use traditional investment and savings accounts, 529 College Savings Plans, UGMAs (Uniform Gift to Minors Accounts), and UTMAs (Uniform Transfers to Minors Act).

But there’s a big problem there. Who’s going to guarantee you won’t lose your money – and your kid’s chance for a great education – in a stock market crash?

Nobody.

Absolutely nobody. Not your broker, certainly. (Try asking him if he’ll guarantee your stock market investment. Get ready to be laughed at.)

Not Uncle Sam. And not the college. Nobody’s going to guarantee that your money in the market will grow. And nobody’s going to guarantee you won’t lose it in the next market crash.

And that’s the thing. This is your kid’s future you’re gambling with, for Pete’s sake. This is money you can’t afford to lose!

And if you can’t afford to lose it, you can’t afford to risk it. Because “Risk = possibility of loss.”

If you can’t afford to lose it, you can’t afford to risk it.”

That’s why the Bank On Yourself strategy for saving for college is becoming more and more popular. [Read more…] “Reviews for Saving for College Using the Bank On Yourself Method”

October 2018 Was Among the Most Volatile Month for Stocks in 118 Years

October was one of the most volatile months for the Dow since 1900. Back then, we were hopping on the first electric buses in New York City and enjoying a new kind of sandwich called a “hamburger” in New Haven. And, we were piling onto an early “Loop the Loop” roller coaster on Wall Street.

Fast forward to October 2018… and enter the Zero-G Inversion Coaster. The Dow fell by over 1,000 points in two days. The S&P 500 dipped in and out of correction multiple times. The Nasdaq plummeted 700 points mid-month, soared over 300 points the next week, and then tumbled back down over 500 points toward month-end. It comes as no surprise that the Fear Index also hit a 3-month high.

It wasn’t Halloween that spooked the markets last month…

Investors had plenty to fear with trade wars, tariffs, rate hikes, Fed policy, underwhelming earnings, slumping housing data, and political partisanship run wild. And as the sugar high of tax cuts, low interest rates and low inflation wears off, there’s a pervading sense that we’ve reached some sort of flashpoint.

What keeps economists up at night? One very sobering question:

What if This Economy is “as Good as It Gets”?

[Read more…] “October 2018 Was Among the Most Volatile Month for Stocks in 118 Years”

Setting the Record Straight on What Bank On Yourself Is – and Isn’t

There are a lot of misconceptions about the meaning of Bank On Yourself. Some folks think it’s just glorified whole life insurance. Others think Bank On Yourself is merely the name of a book.

So, the Bank On Yourself team has created two separate articles. The first explains what Bank On Yourself is, and the second explains what it is not.

What Bank On Yourself Is

Our article on What Is Bank On Yourself? explains that Bank On Yourself is a safe wealth-building strategy – one that puts you in charge, by showing you how to fire your banker, bypass Wall Street, and take back control of your finances. That’s the meaning of Bank On Yourself in a nutshell.

But the article also discusses the benefits of the Bank On Yourself concept. We explain that Bank On Yourself is also the name of our company, and the words “Bank On Yourself” are in the titles of two New York Times best-selling books by Pamela Yellen.

What Bank On Yourself Is NOT

[Read more…] “Setting the Record Straight on What Bank On Yourself Is – and Isn’t”

3 Key Ways You’re Underestimating Your Retirement Costs

Take a moment and think about how much savings you’ll need in retirement.

Write that number down.

Now here’s a reality check: That number is probably low.

Not because of your math skills, but because most people underestimate what their costs will be in three critical ways.

A new study found that 37% of retirees say their overall retirement cost estimates turned out to be low.

And when it comes to healthcare, 44% of retirees said they’re facing higherx costs than they expected. (Source: 2018 Retirement Confidence Survey by Employee Benefit Research Institute)

Three Ways You’re Probably Underestimating Your Retirement Expenses…

#1. Assuming you’ll spend less in retirement than when working

[Read more…] “3 Key Ways You’re Underestimating Your Retirement Costs”