Tax Deferral is a Scam and Here’s Proof

Tax deferral is a con, and I’m going to prove it to you.

Actually, I’m going to let you prove it to yourself, with this 5-second experiment.

The conventional wisdom says, “Maximize your contributions to tax-deferred plans, like 401(k)s, IRAs and 403(b)s. Your money compounds without being reduced by taxes, and you’ll end up with more money during retirement.”

But is it really true?

The Society of Actuaries says that if the tax rates are the same, “It doesn’t make any difference whether [the taxes] are taken away from you at the beginning (tax-exempt) or at the end (tax-deferred). It’s the same fraction of your money that is left to you.”

But most people look at their savings and think it’s all theirs. You may have forgotten you’ll owe the IRS the taxes you deferred all those years – on every penny you’ve put in and every penny of growth.

If the tax rates miraculously manage to be lower during your retirement, you might come out ahead by deferring your taxes. But where do you think tax rates are headed long term? You must consider what tax rates might be during a retirement that could last 30+ years.

Most people realize taxes ultimately must go up due to the aging demographics of our country and our unsustainable national debt, which now exceeds the size of our entire economy. And if tax rates do go up, and you’re successful in growing your nest-egg, you’ll simply end up paying higher taxes on a bigger number.

Don’t take our word for it! You can prove it to yourself in seconds!

We’ve created a calculator that will let you see for yourself which way you’ll come out ahead. Just fill in any starting amount, any tax rate, and any growth rate:

Should You Defer Your Taxes or Pay Them Up Front? Click Here to Find Out Which Way You’ll Come Out Ahead.

You Just Proved that the Idea that You’ll Come Out Ahead by Deferring your Taxes is a Complete Con!

That’s why the Center for Retirement Research says it’s a very big deal when people realize they only have two-thirds of what they thought they had in their tax-deferred 401(k) or IRA retirement account.

And that statement was made before government spending fueled by the pandemic pushed the national debt to exceed the size of the entire U.S. economy… with no end in sight.

The reality is that in the highly likely event that tax rates go up during your retirement, you could end up paying many times more in taxes than you would have if you’d simply paid your taxes upfront, while you know what they are.

It’s bad enough that Americans have most of their retirement savings in government-controlled 401(k)s, IRAs, 403(b)s and similar plans, which have more strings attached to them than a puppet! These plans give you no guarantees of how much money you’ll have when you’re ready to take withdrawals… and no way of knowing how much of those withdrawals you’ll have to fork over to the IRS!

But There Are LEGAL Ways to Protect Yourself from These Inevitably Higher Tax Rates…

The Bank On Yourself safe wealth-building strategy helps protect you from higher taxes and expenses in at least 6 ways:

  1. Unlike with a 401(k) or IRA, you can access both your principal and gains tax free under current tax law – in fact, the income you take isn’t even reported to the IRS. Imagine knowing what your tax rate will be throughout retirement – ZERO!
  2. This strategy is not considered an investment, and the income you take isn’t subject to capital gains taxes.
  3. You can use it to reduce the taxes you may have to pay on your Social Security income. It’s become common for people to owe taxes on up to 85% of their Social Security benefits. However, the income you take from Bank On Yourself is not included when the IRS determines whether (or how much) of your Social Security check is taxed.
  4. It won’t increase your Medicare premiums. The income you take from conventional retirement plans – like 401(k)s and IRAs – can increase your Medicare premiums by as much as 350%! However, the income you take from Bank On Yourself won’t cause your premiums to increase.
  5. The Bank On Yourself safe wealth-building strategy relies on a high cash value, low-commission, dividend-paying whole life insurance policy, and comes with an increasing death benefit that passes to your loved ones income-tax free. This gives you priceless peace of mind.
  6. Many Bank On Yourself-type policies allow you to access a significant portion of your policy’s death benefit during your lifetime to pay for chronic or terminal illnesses or even to cover the cost of care in your own home if you prefer.

If You Want to Shield Yourself from Higher Taxes, It’s Critically Important You Take Action TODAY

Find out how you can shield yourself from taxes that can only go higher, grow your nest egg safely and predictably every single year, and enjoy liquidity, flexibility and control of your money.

Request a free, no-obligation Analysis here now. You’ll get a referral to one of only 200 financial representatives in the U.S. and Canada who have met the rigorous requirements to qualify to use the title of Bank On Yourself Professional. They can answer any questions you may have and show you the bottom-line guaranteed results you could get by adding the Bank On Yourself strategy to your financial plan.

They can also show you ways to find the money to fund your strategy, strategies for rolling over a 401(k) or IRA without owing penalties, and more.

Don’t volunteer to be a victim of the confiscatory tax rates that are coming. Click this button to get started:


How to Never Run Out of Money in Retirement – the Solution Top Experts Recommend

Would it surprise you to know that the #1 retirement fear is running out of money – a fear shared by fully half of Americans? That’s according to a recent study by the Aegon Center for Longevity.

People are deathly afraid of running out of money in retirement for good reason, experts say…

Over the last 40 years, there has been a dramatic shift away from company pension plans that promised workers a certain amount of money every month in retirement for as long as they lived.

Instead, there’s been a seismic shift toward do-it-yourself, cross-your-fingers, hope-and-pray retirement planning strategies like 401(k)s and IRAs. [Read more…] “How to Never Run Out of Money in Retirement – the Solution Top Experts Recommend”

Why More Experts Are Now Saying It’s Time to Ditch Your 401(k)

A growing number of retirement planning experts are joining the chorus of people saying 401(k) plans no longer make sense for savers in recent articles on Motley Fool, Bloomberg, MarketWatch, and other major publications.

They’re lamenting that one of the biggest appeals of the 401(k) – the ability to make contributions with untaxed dollars in exchange for tax-deferred growth and withdrawals – is disappearing.

The national debt was already skyrocketing before the pandemic spurred the biggest fiscal stimulus programs in history. And a surge in unemployment has lowered tax revenue for federal and state governments.

What do governments typically do to counter budget deficits?

They raise taxes, of course!

And as taxes rise, deferring them in a 401(k) or IRA means you’ll pay more later – potentially a lot more.

Even before the pandemic, the Center for Retirement Research said people lose 25%-33% of the value of their 401(k) to taxes… and most people are shocked when it happens because they forget they’ll owe the IRS taxes on every penny they’ve put in and every penny of growth they’ve deferred.

Do you know what the tax rates will be in 20 or 30 years from now? For that matter, do you know what they’ll be next year or in two years?

[Read more…] “Why More Experts Are Now Saying It’s Time to Ditch Your 401(k)”

Coronavirus Pandemic Exposes Cracks in 401(k) Plans

I’ve written extensively about why more and more experts are warning that the 401(k) is an experiment that’s failed, and why the man considered to be the “father” of the 401(k) says it’s a monster that should be destroyed.

But the pandemic, shutdown and resulting economic downturn have exposed dangerous cracks in the 401(k) system. I’ll explain three of them here and show you how to protect yourself…

New 401(k) Problem #1: Companies are Suspending Matching Contributions

Tens of millions of workers have already been affected, and more companies have announced their plans to suspend the 401(k) match.

That’s a real blow for employees who’ve come to think of the match as “free money” and assumed it’s a perk that won’t be yanked with little warning.

But the reality is that the employer match isn’t really “free money” at all. According to a study by the Center for Retirement Research, for every dollar an employer contributes to your 401(k) match, they pay 90 cents less in salary to men and 99 cents less to women!

Translation: For every matching dollar you’re given, you really only receive 10 cents or less in total compensation. [Read more…] “Coronavirus Pandemic Exposes Cracks in 401(k) Plans”

How Much Money Do You Need to Save for Retirement?

People need to save between 10% and 17% of their income if they plan to retire at 65 but are putting away only 6-8% of their income, according to a new study by the Stanford Center on Longevity. That’s only half of what they should be saving.

What percent of your household income are you saving? It’s important to be brutally honest with yourself because a shortfall of the magnitude most Americans will experience means more than just not being able to live the retirement lifestyle you dreamed of. It may mean…

  • Having to choose between putting food on the table and the medical care you need
  • Not being able to afford to pay for heating and air conditioning
  • Having to rely on the charity of your children
  • Foregoing travel and even life’s little luxuries

I doubt you worked hard all your life so that you can scrimp and sacrifice just to get by in retirement.

Fully 60% of U.S. households are at risk of not having enough money to make ends meet in retirementeven if they cut back to spending just 75% of pre-retirement levels – according to a 2018 study from the Center for Retirement Research.

The Rule of 25 for Determining How Much You’ll Need to Have Saved

[Read more…] “How Much Money Do You Need to Save for Retirement?”

Why You’ll Need $500,000+ in Retirement for Medical Expenses Alone

Retirees spend more than a third of their Social Security benefits on out-of-pocket medical costs, on average, according to a new study by the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College.

Even after factoring in other sources of income, medical spending still took a huge bite – 18% – of seniors’ total retirement income.

A 65-year-old couple retiring now will need $275,000 to cover out-of-pocket health care costs during retirement, according to a study by Fidelity.

The news gets even worse, however, because these numbers do not include the cost of nursing home or home health care.

That can range from $40,000 a year for home health aides… to over $85,000 a year for a semi-private room in a nursing home, according to the Genworth 2017 Annual Cost of Care Survey: Costs Continue to Rise Across All Care Settings. And if you prefer a private nursing care room, you’ll have to cough up almost $100,000 a year.

Ignore the likelihood of needing long-term care services at your own peril: At least 70% of people over age 65 will require long-term care services, and more than 40% will need nursing home care, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Based on the average cost of a nursing home room and the average length of stay – which is 2.8 years – you would need over $250,000 to cover a single stay. [Read more…] “Why You’ll Need $500,000+ in Retirement for Medical Expenses Alone”

Federal Reserve Survey: Your 401(k) and IRA Won't Give You a Decent Retirement

If you’re counting on your 401(k) or IRA for retirement income, I have some bad news for you…

A new analysis of the Federal Reserve’s latest Survey of Consumer Finances by the Center for Retirement Research demonstrates that 401(k) plans are destined to fail millions of Americans.

The Federal Reserve survey is updated every three years, and the latest one reveals that, in spite of the long-running bull market and an improving economy … the typical couple nearing retirement will only receive $600 per month from their 401(k)s and IRAs combined.

That $600 a month is not indexed for inflation, so its purchasing power will decline over time.

And that $600 a month is likely to be the only source of income people will have to supplement Social Security because the typical household has virtually no other savings outside of its 401(k) and IRAs.

The Retirement Savings Shortfall News is Even Worse for Younger Workers with 401(k)s

[Read more…] “Federal Reserve Survey: Your 401(k) and IRA Won't Give You a Decent Retirement”

52% of Americans Will Have to Reduce Their Lifestyle in Retirement

52% of American households are at risk of not being able to maintain their standard of living in retirement – even when factoring in potential proceeds of a reverse mortgage.

That’s according to the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College.

Let’s take a look at three critical reasons for that… and what you must do now to protect yourself…

Problem #1: People continue to live longer, but aren’t working longer

According to the Social Security Administration, 25% of people turning 65 today will live past 90, and one out of ten will live past 95, yet most financial planners base their projections of how much money you’ll need on your living to age 85 or so.

What if you’re one of the lucky ones who hangs on until 100 or longer? And just how “lucky” will you feel if you can’t provide for yourself during those final years?

Solution: Assume you’ll live to at last age 100 when determining how long your money will need to last you.

Problem #2: Underestimating health-care and long-term care costs in retirement

The numbers are shocking, and almost no one is accurately accounting for this: A 65-year-old couple retiring now will need $245,000 just to cover out-of-pocket health-care costs during retirement, PLUS another $255,000 to cover one average stay for one person in a nursing home.

Whoa! That’s half a million dollars you’ll need just for medical care… but most people close to retirement don’t even have that much in total retirement savings. [Read more…] “52% of Americans Will Have to Reduce Their Lifestyle in Retirement”