52% of Americans Will Have to Reduce Their Lifestyle in Retirement

52% of American households are at risk of not being able to maintain their standard of living in retirement – even when factoring in potential proceeds of a reverse mortgage.

That’s according to the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College.

Let’s take a look at three critical reasons for that… and what you must do now to protect yourself…

Problem #1: People continue to live longer, but aren’t working longer

According to the Social Security Administration, 25% of people turning 65 today will live past 90, and one out of ten will live past 95, yet most financial planners base their projections of how much money you’ll need on your living to age 85 or so.

What if you’re one of the lucky ones who hangs on until 100 or longer? And just how “lucky” will you feel if you can’t provide for yourself during those final years?

Solution: Assume you’ll live to at last age 100 when determining how long your money will need to last you.

Problem #2: Underestimating health-care and long-term care costs in retirement

The numbers are shocking, and almost no one is accurately accounting for this: A 65-year-old couple retiring now will need $245,000 just to cover out-of-pocket health-care costs during retirement, PLUS another $255,000 to cover one average stay for one person in a nursing home.

Whoa! That’s half a million dollars you’ll need just for medical care… but most people close to retirement don’t even have that much in total retirement savings.

Solution: Increase the amount you save every single year, and put more of your savings in financial vehicles that are safe and guaranteed to grow even when the markets are tumbling.

Problem #3: Underestimating the impact of a stock market crash just before or after you retire

A stock market crash at that stage of your life can reduce your retirement lifestyle – forever.

Read: How Sequence of Returns Risk Can Devastate Your Retirement Lifestyle.

Solution: Take full responsibility for your own financial security.

Don’t rely on the “conventional” retirement planning wisdom – what everyone just assumes is true … because everyone else assumes it’s true. And if the conventional wisdom were correct, then why would the majority of Americans have to worry about lowering their lifestyle in retirement?

How to Enjoy Financial Security and a Rich Retirement for Life

FACT: It isn’t necessary to risk your money to grow a sizable nest-egg. Hundreds of thousands of folks have bypassed Wall Street and achieved true financial security for life using a supercharged variation of dividend-paying whole life insurance.

It’s an asset that’s grown in value every single year for more than 160 years – including during the Great Depression, Great Recession, and during every period of economic boom and bust.

You can know your bottom-line, guaranteed numbers and results before you decide if adding the Bank On Yourself method to your financial plan is right for you. It’s amazing how motivating saving money becomes when you don’t have to worry about the next market crash wiping out your hard-earned savings again.

No other financial product comes with as many advantages and guarantees as Bank On Yourself – including safety, predictability, liquidity and control, along with numerous tax advantages.

Find out how much more peace of mind and retirement security you could enjoy if you added Bank On Yourself to your financial plan when you request your FREE Analysis here:

Please do yourself and your family a favor and click the link above to take the first step!

21 Reasons Life Insurance Policy Owners Love the Policy Loan Feature

We recently published a 3-article blog post series inspired by an article that financial planner and investment advisor Michael Kitces wrote about the problems with “banking on yourself” with life insurance policy loans.

Then we invited our readers to tell us what their biggest take-away from these articles was, and to share their personal experience with Bank On Yourself policy loans versus other sources of financing.

The many comments left on these three blog posts demonstrated once again how insightful and articulate our readers are! We’ve published excerpts from some of the comments we received below, where you’ll find 21 reasons why using a Bank On Yourself-type policy loan to access cash beats any other way of accessing capital!

In the first article, we discuss four things Mr. Kitces got right about the Bank On Yourself concept, and then reveal what he got wrong, including five fundamental concepts.

Check out What Michael Kitces Missed in His Bank On Yourself Review, Part 1. [Read more…]

Trump Tweets, Black Swan Events and Your Money

How much does your financial future depend on a 140-character Trump tweet, stroke of a pen on an Executive Order, or an off-hand comment to a reporter?

A lot, as these recent news headlines reveal:

  • “Trump Sinks Pharma Stocks on Medicare Price Negotiation”
  • “Dollar Dumps Most in 30 Years as Trump Raises Doubt Over Strong Dollar”
  • “When Trump Tweets, Wall Street Trades – Instantly”
  • “Trump, Not the Fed, Is What Moves Markets Now”
  • “Toyota Stock Drops Immediately After Trump Tweet”
  • “Trump’s Executive Orders Send S&P 500 to an All-Time High”
  • “Dow Jones Industrial Average Sells Off After Trump’s Executive Order on Immigration”

As you can see, when President Trump tweets or speaks, the markets react – in some cases violently.

Whatever your opinion of Trump is, there is one thing we can all agree on:

We are in uncharted waters. We have never had a president like Trump. We’ve never had an administration like Trump’s. There is no historical precedent for this. [Read more…]

Five Pieces of Free Financial Advice on Saving and Investing You Should Avoid

We all love free advice. Why pay for advice if someone is willing to give it to you for free?

Some advice will cost you little or nothing if it’s wrong. “You should wear these shoes with that suit.” “Try the catch-of-the-day. You’ll love it!” “I think you should turn left here.”

Other bad advice can be much more costly—both now and for the rest of your life.

This article focuses on free financial advice. We’ll tell you why five bits of so-called “wisdom” you’ve heard over and over again are wrong.

We’ll give you some tips on choosing sources of free financial advice you can trust, while avoiding all the dumb financial advice that’s out there.

Why Free Financial Advice Is Often Dumb Financial Advice

[Read more…]

The 8th Wonder of the World? Here’s proof

Recently we “ethically bribed” our readers into learning more about what I’ve called the “8th Wonder of the World.”

You see, the two most common reasons people have for adding the Bank On Yourself method to their financial plan are:

  1. To grow wealth safely and predictably every year – no matter what’s happening in the market or the economy – and to protect themselves from losses in future market crashes
  2. To become their own source of financing when they want to make a major purchase or when an emergency expense comes up – so they can get access to money when they need it and for whatever they want – no questions asked

The second reason – the ability to become your own “banker” – is so compelling that once people use that feature of their Bank On Yourself plan, they often write to tell us what a powerful and emancipating feeling it is. [Read more…]

Michael Kitces’ Big Blind Spot on Bank On Yourself Policy Loans

In his review of Bank On Yourself, Michael Kitces repeatedly harped on the worst-case scenario of a life insurance policy owner taking out a life insurance loan with no regard for ever paying it back.

Kitces rightly pointed out there could be significant tax consequences if a life insurance policy were to lapse due to a large policy loan.

If the interest is not paid, it gets added to the loan balance. Eventually the loan balance could come so close to the cash value securing the loan that the life insurance company—after giving fair warning—would take the cash value to pay off the loan, causing the policy to lapse.

What Kitces didn’t mention is that if the loan balance ever does exceed the available cash value, paying some or all of the loan interest out of pocket generally solves the problem. And he didn’t tell you about the option of taking a policy “reduced paid-up,” as I discussed in our previous article on this topic.

So, we agree with Michael Kitces that a growing loan can cause a life insurance policy to lapse.

But Kitces mostly talks about “when the policy lapses.” Huh? “When”? That’s an odd assumption. It’s like saying, “Don’t take out a mortgage to buy a home, because when you default on your loan …”

Does he really think we are that irresponsible? [Read more…]

Why Your Efforts to Grow a Retirement Nest Egg in the Stock Market May Disappoint You

You’re not reckless. You don’t like to take unnecessary risk. But you don’t want to run out of money in retirement. And your financial advisor says you must invest in the market to provide for a secure retirement.

Do you really have to take those risks? What if I told you that hundreds of thousands of people are building their retirement nest egg without even going near the stock market … or the real estate market … or precious metals?

When people think of “the stock market,” they often equate it with the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) they see quoted everywhere.

The Dow is the most recognized market index in the world, and looking at its performance can help answer the question: Does your advisor’s advice make any sense?

The Dow has gone up over time – but has it gone up enough to make it worth the risk?

Only you can decide if it was worth the risk to you. But to make an intelligent decision, you first need the answers to two questions:

  1. How much has the Dow gone up?
  2. What were the risks?

Only then can you decide if it was worth it. [Read more…]

Here’s What Michael Kitces Missed in His Bank On Yourself Review, Part 2

In part 1 of this article, I explained that financial planner and investment advisor Michael Kitces wrote a review of the Bank On Yourself concept that redefined my trademarked phrase, “Bank On Yourself” to fit his interpretation of how the concept works.

Now I’ll show you how Kitces missed five critical key requirements of the Bank On Yourself concept—and why it’s so important that you don’t make the same mistake.

To review, to truly be banking on yourself

  1. You must use a dividend-paying whole life insurance policy
  2. The policy must have a “non-direct recognition” policy loan feature
  3. The policy must incorporate a flexible policy design
  4. You, as the policy owner, must be an “honest banker”
  5. You must work with a knowledgeable advisor

Let’s See How Michael Kitces Misunderstood—or Simply Missed—Each of These Five Requirements of Bank On Yourself:

1. You must use a dividend-paying whole life insurance policy

[Read more…]

Here’s What Michael Kitces Missed in His Bank On Yourself Review, Part 1

Financial planner and investment advisor Michael Kitces understands a lot about many areas of money and finance. He has been to school. He has twice as many letters after his name as he has in his name. Literally.

Surprisingly, Kitces does not understand some basic fundamentals of the Bank On Yourself strategy for personal finance.

Kitces wrote a review of the Bank On Yourself concept. And while he got some of the fundamentals right, he missed some very important points.

From time to time, readers ask us about Kitces’ article, so I want to clear up the misconceptions in it. I’ll cover four things he got right about the Bank On Yourself strategy, then I’ll reveal the things Kitces got wrong—including five fundamental concepts.

Here’s What Michael Kitces Got Right in His Bank On Yourself Review …

In his Bank On Yourself review, Michael Kitces correctly stated four things:

1. Kitces: Permanent life insurance “gives an insurance company the means to provide policy owners a personal loan at favorable interest rates, because the cash value provides collateral for the loan”

Well stated! You can’t take out a life insurance policy loan unless you have a life insurance policy with enough cash value to serve as collateral for the loan. And the interest charged for policy loans is generally at competitive, below-market rates.

2. Kitces: “Even as cash value life insurance operates as collateral for a life insurance policy loan, it also remains invested, earning a rate of return that slows the erosion of the net equity in the policy”

[Read more…]

Why Most Early Proponents of the 401(k) Now Say It’s a Failure

Herbert Whitehouse was one of the first proponents of the 401(k) 35 years ago, when he was a human resources executive at Johnson & Johnson.

Today the 65-year-old Whitehouse says he will have to work into his mid-70s if he wants to maintain his standard of living, after his own 401(k) took a hit in 2008.

Whitehouse is one of a chorus of early 401(k) supporters who have changed their minds.

A recent article in the Wall Street Journal reveals how pre-retirees at all income levels are falling shortway short – of the amount of money they need to have to be able to retire.

Fully half of those between ages 50-64 have less than one year of their income saved.

The top 10% (those making $251,000 or more annually) have an average of only two years of their income saved.

The article mentions that “financial experts recommend that people amass at least eight times their annual salary to retire.”

Those “experts” ought to have their heads examined, because even a $1 million nest-egg would provide you only $28,000 a year at the current recommended withdrawal rate of 2.8% per year. [Read more…]